Best practices in mold design for ABBYY Flexicapture Fixed mold processing

There are several considerations of mold design that need to be considered to provide an accurate quote for an ABBYY Flexicapture solution. First, the analyst must determine whether the forms to be processed require the use of the basic solid product or the more advanced Flexilayout Studio. As the price difference between the two is significant, the customer will not be satisfied if they determine that the solid product is unable to produce acceptable results on their documents.

Another and extremely important consideration of shape design that will affect the offering is the requirement for Flexicapture software to process tables or repeat groups. This is significant because some forms are naturally suitable for the use of a table object in the form design, whether the form is created in ABBYY FormDesigner, Adobe InDesign (the preferred method) or the client has an existing form that requires processing. Again, since there is a significant difference in price for adding the table element / repeat group option to the system, your customer will not be satisfied if you decide you need this technology to process the form.

Finally, determine in advance and include in the quote specific details about who is responsible for shape design and testing. The mold design process can be very time consuming and you the customers a great advantage by defining the responsibilities and fees for mold design and validation in your proposal.

Tips for using the ABBYY FormDesigner tool

You can save yourself significant grief by understanding ABBYY FormDesigner as a tool for creating prototypes of forms to export to Adobe InDesign image format for final design. There may be exceptions to this principle for certain simple forms with limited, widely separated elements. This advice on using only FormDesigner for prototype will save you considerable grief when it comes to producing forms that work well in Flexicapture, though FormDesigner automatically creates much of the document definition (template).

The following are some examples of how FormDesigner could help you design a better shape as you begin production mold design using a form design tool such as Adobe InDesign.

  • Use the designer to specify the exact dimension of shape objects, and then use those dimensions when building the shape in InDesign. For example, using the ABBYY tool to design a series of text entry fields with 4 mm wide and 5 mm high selection frames.

  • Use the designer to quickly alternate prototype versions of forms containing a “straw man” set of form fields. Consider a prototype with the form elements generated by ABBYY FormDesigner.

  • Create an image that contains the required side anchor elements, such as black squares or angled corners.

  • Create bar code element for matching the document definition.

  • Create all columns and a row of data for a table element.

  • Use the designer for a “fill-in template” element that shows users of the form how to properly print the handwritten letters and select the check boxes.

  • A table object with check boxes or text entry fields.

  • Text entry fields using restricted elements.

  • Build a prototype with a combination of elements for quick testing with the customer.

Considerations on shape design for different field types

In general, you want to be sure to provide as much information as possible in the document definition field properties for each field on the form. This may seem intuitive until you realize that the more information about the field, the less opportunities Flexicapture has to assign to the field. For example, there may be a small difference between specifying just a data type as a name versus a first name. Finally, anytime you can use a database lookup to limit the possible values ​​for the field, you will increase the accuracy of the recognition.

Text entry field for ICR

We’ve found that we can achieve superior recognition results when we use the text box series selection type and then designate the number of cells when creating the document definition for handwriting recognition (ICR). These full squares appear to provide a better method for users to enter data, and Flexicapture works better when using this selection pattern. These work even better when you create them with a color that falls out during the scanning process. Most newer scanners support such a feature. The other type that works very well is this same type of character box series, but with cell boxes marked in a dropout color. When you create the document definition with this type, you just have to change the selection type to “simple”, since when the form is scanned, the selection of the character box series disappears, leaving only the characters themselves. Finally, we have not had very good results using the “dotted frame” tagging method provided by FormDesigner. The problem with these types of labeling is that during the scanning process, the dots tend to enlarge below the degree of freedom added during the scan. Think of what is known as “fax games.” A person in an office creates a copy of the document and sends that first copy through a fax machine, which is in fact a very low quality scanner. The person at the other end receives the fax and sends it by mail. Fax to another person and the cycle repeats. After a dozen fax messages, the document has changed quite a bit by darkening text areas and noise (dots and blemishes). The same thing seems to happen the same, and when the text input fields are marked with the dotted frames, they tend to get thicker with scanning. Even when the document definition is set to de-speckle, you will experience poor recognition results for handwritten values.

OMR marker field

We have found superior results when using the rectangular field marking for these fields. As an alternative, we tried to use oval markings instead of rectangles, and when the document definition was created, it specified rectangular values ​​as no oval option is available. This type of labeling worked very well, even with the ovals.

Proposals for inclusion of options in business proposals

Our advice to anyone writing a Flexicapture proposal is to include adding table object (and repeating groups) as an option along with the semi-structured Flexilayout Studio pricing in each proposal. This only takes a little time and can avoid an unhappy customer when the need for one of these options arises.

scenario:

I worked with a company that wanted to extract handwritten text and select data from a form. During the sales cycle, we created a template for demo purposes using the fixed form Flexicapture standalone system without the table setting. When we achieved good results, we never included the option or even mentioned the possible necessity of the ability to process tables in the offer. Once the customer purchased the system, they began to create new order forms to optimize the extraction results using the ABBYY FormDesigner Tool to create a prototype. Then they finished the shape design using Adobe InDesign. It was quickly determined that the customer needed the table setting on their system because of the special design of their shape. When I approached the client with this information, they asked me tightly why even the possibility of this need was mentioned during the prison. I explained that their original shape was not suitable for the use of table objects, but their new shape design worked best with the use of this more advanced technology. After some discussion, they agreed to buy the option.

conclusion

Use the ABBYY FormDesigner tool to create high-quality prototype forms for testing and evaluation, and then create the production form in Adobe InDesign using the form elements produced in the ABBYY tool. Be careful about specifying page elements on forms to optimize the data extraction capabilities of the ABBYY Flexicapture system.

Adobe, InDesign, ABBYY and ABBYY Flexicapture are registered trademarks of Adobe and ABBBYY, respectively, all rights reserved.

Appendix: Scripting example for counting count values

We were asked by a prospective client if we could 1. Count the number of times a group of check boxes was selected and 2. Count the number of selections for the group to which the check mark belonged, either normal or significant. Some control marks were in the normal category, while others were assigned to the more critical “significant” category. The following is the script that we created in the document definition for this action. You may find it useful when compiling and doing mathematical calculations for OMR fields.

Just missing

Weak flaws

‘The script determines a number of check boxes on the forms for the four field groups (1.Check – 4.Other)

‘It reports a separate value for the total number of deficiencies and another for significant deficiencies

‘Significant deficiencies are shown in bold in the image and the fields are designated -SIG

‘Set the variable to zero so that it is not a zero so that it can be increased

‘But do this only for the first time for checkbox group 1, then the whole project will increase

missing = 0

missing = 0

‘Change the field value to the correct value, could do this in one for the next loop, but there are only three values

if Me.Field (“1a”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

quit if

‘increment, then repeat the counter for the remaining fields

if Me.Field (“1b”). value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“1c-SIG”). value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

‘increasing the significant deficiencies as 1c is a bold value in the form field

‘change this for each bold field on the form

sickness deficiencies = sickness deficiencies + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“2a”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“2b”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“2c-SIG”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

sickness deficiencies = sickness deficiencies + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“2d-SIG”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

sickness deficiencies = sickness deficiencies + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“2e-SIG”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

sickness deficiencies = sickness deficiencies + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“2f-SIG”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

sickness deficiencies = sickness deficiencies + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“2g”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“2 hours”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“2i-SIG”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

sickness deficiencies = sickness deficiencies + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“3rd-SIG”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

sickness deficiencies = sickness deficiencies + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“3b”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“3c”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“3d-SIG”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

sickness deficiencies = sickness deficiencies + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“3e”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“4a”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“4b”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“4c-SIG”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

sickness deficiencies = sickness deficiencies + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“4d”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

quit if

if Me.Field (“4e-SIG”). Value = “Y” then

missing = missing + 1

sickness deficiencies = sickness deficiencies + 1

quit if

Me.Field (“Count of Deficiencies”). Value = missing

Me.Field (“Count of Significant Deficiencies”). Value = missing